durgapolashi:

"There’s no world in which I would surrender the intimidating beauty of Yoruba-language poetry for, say, Shakespeare’s sonnets, nor one in which I’d prefer the chamber orchestras of Brandenburg to the koras of Mali. I’m happy to own all of it. This carefree confidence is, in part, the gift of time. It is a dividend of the struggle of people from earlier generations. I feel no alienation in museums. But this question of filiation tormented Baldwin considerably. He was sensitive to what was great in world art, and sensitive to his own sense of exclusion from it. He made a similar list in the title essay of “Notes of a Native Son” (one begins to feel that lists like this had been flung at him during arguments): “In some subtle way, in a really profound way, I brought to Shakespeare, Bach, Rembrandt, to the Stones of Paris, to the Cathedral at Chartres, and the Empire State Building a special attitude. These were not really my creations, they did not contain my history; I might search them in vain forever for any reflection of myself. I was an interloper; this was not my heritage.” The lines throb with sadness. What he loves does not love him in return."
Black Body: Rereading James Baldwin’s “Stranger in the Village”
BY TEJU COLE

durgapolashi:

"There’s no world in which I would surrender the intimidating beauty of Yoruba-language poetry for, say, Shakespeare’s sonnets, nor one in which I’d prefer the chamber orchestras of Brandenburg to the koras of Mali. I’m happy to own all of it. This carefree confidence is, in part, the gift of time. It is a dividend of the struggle of people from earlier generations. I feel no alienation in museums. But this question of filiation tormented Baldwin considerably. He was sensitive to what was great in world art, and sensitive to his own sense of exclusion from it. He made a similar list in the title essay of “Notes of a Native Son” (one begins to feel that lists like this had been flung at him during arguments): “In some subtle way, in a really profound way, I brought to Shakespeare, Bach, Rembrandt, to the Stones of Paris, to the Cathedral at Chartres, and the Empire State Building a special attitude. These were not really my creations, they did not contain my history; I might search them in vain forever for any reflection of myself. I was an interloper; this was not my heritage.” The lines throb with sadness. What he loves does not love him in return."

Black Body: Rereading James Baldwin’s “Stranger in the Village”

BY TEJU COLE

Reblogged from durgapolashi

asylum-art:

Kinky Tapestry: by Erin M Riley

Using traditional tapestry techniques, Erin M.Riley weaves images of women in states of undress or exposure, personal objects or landscapes that are related to destruction and death. With her work, she is examining the honesty of sexuality but also how courtships, pornography and sex is changing as a result of the mass depiction of these intimate moments online.

The artist states: “My work is the culmination of research into addiction, sexual experimentation, popular internet culture, the effects of single parent households, socio-economic status’ etc. I am drawn to the images taken for private exchanges that become littered on the internet. I am using my own images that I have sent to lovers as well as the objects that I have formed psychological attachments to, objects that have impacted people’s lives, displays of arrests, deaths, addictions.”

Reblogged from pleasantdistractions